Arizona State University School of Music

Applied Piano Study

Course Syllabus

MUP 111, 311, 511, 127, 327, 527, 727, 121, 321, 521

Spring 2014

 

Professor:   Walter Cosand (Walter.Cosand@asu.edu, W-254)

 

General Requirements for all Applied Piano Students

 

All students will need to attend studio classes and keyboard area recitals.  The studio classes afford each student valuable performance opportunities throughout the semester.  In addition, discussion will be encouraged on the following topics: Performance practice and style, technical solutions for common problems, sound production, repertoire and style difference between different renowned pianists.  Students will be encouraged to express their opinions on these matters and provide constructive criticism for their fellow performers.

 

Studio classes generally occur during the 12:00 noon Monday hour but may vary by instructor. Each student should check with the assigned studio teacher for the specific studio class schedule of that teacher each semester. 

 

Students at the 127, 327, 527 and 727 levels are required to perform their entire repertoire for the semester at least once in studio classes.  Students at the 121, 321, 521, 111, 311 levels are required to perform their assigned jury pieces for the semester at least once during studio.

 

Recitals and Master Classes attendance requirement:
1. Students must attend all studio classes and Keyboard Area Recitals as announced (3 or 4 times per semester, Mondays 12-1PM). Keyboard Area Recitals
feature pianists who have been selected by their studio teachers to perform for all keyboard students.
2. Students must attend School of Music Showcase Recitals as announced (twice per semester, Wednesdays at 12-1PM)
3. Students are required to attend Guest Artist Solo Piano Recitals (4 solo this semester.)
4. Students are encouraged to attend piano master class at days and times announced. Students may be excused from the master classes only in case of illness or if they have a conflict with a class they are taking or teaching during that time.

 

Students will schedule lessons with their individual instructor.

 

Students will need to acquire their own copies of the music they play.  In addition, students will need to research the pieces and demonstrate knowledge of:

1.    dates of composition, including other pieces written by the composer during the same time period; knowledge of pieces written by other composers during the same time period.

2.    a wide range of recordings of the pieces they play, accompanied by the ability to discuss differences of interpretation, articulation, tempo, and sound.

 

Grading Policy

 

The final grade for each semester shall be a composite of the studio grade, awarded by the studio teacher, and the jury grade, awarded by the faculty present at semester juries. In cases where a student is giving a degree recital during the semester, the recital grade will replace jury grade.

The studio grade will count 40% of the final semester grade, and the jury or recital grade 40% as well. Studio, recital and master class attendance will be the other 20%.

The grading scale is as follows: 97-100=A+
94-96= A
90-93=A- 
87-89=B+
84-86= B
80-83=B- 
77-79=C+
74-77=C
70-73=C-

The deadline for course withdrawal is April 6.

 

MUP 111

 

General: This course earns two credit hours with one fifty-minute lesson per week and is typically taken for the first two years of study (Freshman-Sophomore).  Students must have selected piano as their performing medium, but are not performance majors.  Admission to MUP 111 is by audition only. Students transferring from other institutions enter at MUP 111 regardless of prior study. Students apply for advancement to MUP 311 upon decision of their studio instructor.

 

Objectives: Work is necessary on such topics as: developing a comfortable pianistic approach to the instrument, sound production, and developing an understanding of stylistic periods.  Continuous work is done to develop the studentŐs ability to work independently and to improve all aspects of piano playing and musicianship.

 

Repertoire: Students will need to cover repertoire ranging from the Baroque to the present era.  Students will study compositions from standard repertoire, such as: Bach Inventions, and Preludes and Fugues from the Well-Tempered Clavier; Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven sonatas; Chopin, Schumann, and Debussy character pieces; and Bartok Mikrokosmos, Vols. IV-VI.

 

Requirements: Each student will perform a final jury examination of ten minutes in length which consists of memorized works agreed upon with the instructor, representing at least three different style periods.  Students are expected to do a minimum of two hours of practice per day, although more is strongly encouraged.

 

MUP 311

 

General: This course earns two credit hours with one fifty-minute lesson per week. This course is offered for students who are in their Junior-Senior years, and have selected piano as their performing medium, but are not performance majors.

Advancement from MUP 111 to MUP 311 is not automatic. Admission to MUP 311 takes place at a barrier jury examination heard by the piano faculty, normally after four semesters of MUP 111. At this time the faculty decides whether or not the student has arrived at the appropriate level for the degree. The student may be admitted to MUP 311, or if the faculty deems that the student has not arrived at that level, advancement to MUP 311 may be delayed or the student may be advised to pursue another major.

 

Objectives: Students are expected to have achieved a higher level of technical and musical performance than MUP 111. Emphasis will be given to the topics of interpretation, style, expanding repertoire, and the preparation of the student for a half recital (where this is required by the specific degree, such as Jazz Performance and Music Education). Students will be taught to develop practice habits that will produce a confident performance.

 

Repertoire: Students will need to cover repertoire ranging from the Baroque to the late 20th century, but more advanced pieces than MUP 111.

 

Requirements: Each student will perform a final jury examinations of ten minutes in length and consisting of memorized works agreed upon with the instructor representing three or four different style periods.  Students are expected to do a minimum of two hours of practice per day, although more is strongly encouraged.

 

MUP 511

 

General: This course earns two credit hours with one fifty-minute lesson per week. It is offered for graduate students in the keyboard area (usually for students who have completed the MUP 311 studio lesson requirement for their degree, or are preparing a 527 audition), graduate students in composition and music theatre direction, and graduate students in the interdisciplinary humanities program. Admittance is by audition only. The final jury examinations are ten minutes in length and consist of memorized works agreed upon with the studentŐs instructor.

 

MUP 127

 

General: This course earns four credit hours with one fifty-minute lesson per week. It is a course for students who have been admitted by audition into the performance or piano accompanying degrees. This course is offered for students who are in their Freshman-Sophomore years.

 

Objectives: Although students who were admitted into MUP 127 are expected to have achieved a high level of facility and musicianship, some work is necessary on such topics as: developing a more comfortable pianistic approach to the instrument, sound production, and the understanding of style.  Students will be taught how to develop practice habits that will produce a confident performance.

 

Repertoire: Pieces from the baroque period to late 20th century. In addition, the repertoire selected will include pieces that are presumed standardized in the international concert and competition scene in order to prepare the student for a performance career or for advanced graduate study. Repertoire will include: 

Etudes: Chopin, Liszt, Rachmaninoff, Scriabin, etc.

Concertos: Mozart, Beethoven, Rachmaninoff, Schumann, Chopin, Grieg, Mendelssohn, Tchaikovsky, etc.

Sonatas: Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert, etc.

 

Requirements: The final jury examinations are twenty minutes in length and consist of memorized works agreed upon with the instructor representing three or four different style periods. Students in the 127 series of applied study are expected to do a minimum of three to four hours of practice per day, although more is strongly encouraged.

 

MUP 327

 

General: This course earns four credit hours with one fifty-minute lesson per week. It is offered for students who are in their Junior-Senior years. Advancement from MUP 127 to MUP 327 is not automatic. Admission to MUP 327 takes place at a barrier jury examination heard by the piano faculty, normally after four semesters of MUP 127. At this time the faculty decides whether or not the student has attained the proficiency to perform a junior recital in the following year. If the faculty deems that the student has not arrived at that level, advancement to MUP 327 may be delayed or the student may be advised to pursue another major.

 

Objectives: Students at this level are expected to have achieved a high level of facility and musicianship. Emphasis on quick memorization of repertoire, physical ease in performance, and--while respecting the composers' wishes--development of maximum variety and spontaneity of expressive style. Emphasis will also be given to the topics of interpretation and preparation of the student for a polished performance in the required degree recitals.

 

Repertoire: Selection will include pieces from the baroque period to the late 20th century of more difficulty than MUP 127. As in MUP 127, the repertoire selected will also include continuous work on pieces that are presumed standardized on the international concert and competition scene. Emphasis will be given to big solo and concerti works from the 19th and 20th century (i.e. sonatas or other substantial works by Chopin, Schumann, Brahms, Rachmaninoff, Prokofieff, Scriabin, etc.) Students will also be encouraged to prepare a substantial contemporary work.

 

Requirements: The final jury examinations are twenty minutes in length and consist of memorized works agreed upon with the instructor representing three or four different style periods. Students are required to give a total of two recitals: a 45-minute recital in Junior year and a full recital in Senior year. Students in the 327 series of applied study are expected to do a minimum of three to four hours of practice per day, although more is strongly encouraged.

 

MUP 527

 

General: Students admitted to this course are pursuing a master of music degree in Performance or Performance/Pedagogy.

 

Objectives: In some cases, work on any areas of weaknesses will need to be addressed by the instructor. Emphasis will be given to the understanding of the relationships between articulation, rhythm, and interpretation, and to the development of confident, refined performance.

 

Repertoire: Although the repertoire studied will include pieces from the Baroque period to the late 20th century, the selection of the material will be determined individually for each student according to his/her concentration desires. Repertoire will generally consist of substantial solo works, concerti, and contemporary works. Emphasis will be given to the topics of interpretation and the preparation of the student for polished musical performances on degree recitals.

 

Requirements: Students will perform one (Performance/Pedagogy) or two (Performance) solo recitals representing a high level of artistic interpretation, and demonstrating considerable difficulty of repertoire. The final jury examinations are twenty minutes in length and consist of presentations by memory of works agreed upon with the instructor.  Students in the 527 series of applied study are expected to do four to six hours of practice per day.

 

MUP 727

 

General: Students admitted to this course are pursuing a Doctor of Musical Arts degree in Solo Performance or Solo Performance/Pedagogy.  This level of performance is expected to lead to a career in college or university teaching.

 

Objectives: Students admitted to this course of study are expected to possess the highest artistic and technical command of the instrument.  Students will be encouraged to take part in various national and international performance venues, conferences, and music festivals.  Emphasis will be given to stylistic approach and interpretation. Students are expected to perform polished individual performances on their degree recitals.

 

Repertoire: Students are expected to program the recitals largely according to their own concentration desires.  However, the instructor will act as a mentor in advising the student on repertoire suitable to the studentŐs career goals, strengths, doctoral project, and breadth of performance repertoire necessary for future academic positions.

 

Requirements: Students will perform three required solo recitals (Performance) or one solo and one lecture recital (Performance/Pedagogy emphasis). One jury examination of 45 minutes consisting of memorized works agreed upon with instructor will be taken at the end of the first year of study and serve as recitals-permission for the degree program. Students failing to pass this exam will be allowed to take it only once more during the following semester. Students in the 727 series of applied study are expected to practice daily appropriate to artist-level performance.

 

MUP 121/321/521

 

This course is a one credit hour course, with a 25-minute lesson a week.  Limited spaces will be designated each semester by audition only, and priority will be given to students with extensive prior piano study, or those who have waived and/or completed all class piano requirements for their degree. Students will usually be placed with teaching assistants, or occasionally with faculty members. No jury is required. Grades will be based on completing assigned work, progress, and participation in studio classes.

 

Special Accommodations

 

To request academic accommodations due to a disability please contact the ASU Disability Resource Center (Phone: (480) 965-1234; TDD: (480) 965-9000). This is a very important step, as accommodations cannot be made retroactively.  If you have a letter from their office indicating that you have a disability which requires academic accommodations, please present the letter to me no later than the end of the first week of the semester so that your needs can be addressed effectively.

 

Academic Dishonesty

 

All necessary and appropriate sanctions will be issued to all parties involved with plagiarizing any and all course work. Plagiarism and any other form of academic dishonesty that is in violation with the Student Code of Conduct will not be tolerated. For more information, please see the ASU Student Academic Integrity Policy. http://provost.asu.edu/academicintegrity

 

Use of Media During Classes and Recitals

 

Out of respect for your peers and the instructors, cell phones must be turned off or to the silent mode during class. It is inappropriate to answer calls during class time. If you choose to take notes or look at course materials using a laptop, please be professional and refrain from emailing or doing other non-class work. You are responsible for the safety of any media or equipment.

 

Downloadable Repertoire

 

Please notice that my website offers a library of free digital music. http://www.waltercosand.com/CosandScores

 

 

Requirements Specifically for Students of Mr. Cosand:

 

Studio Recital

 

On Tuesday, April 15, at 7:30 P.M. the students of Mr. Cosand will present a recital "Studio 254 LIVE!" in Katzin Concert Hall. This program will be made up of short works by living composers. (We will define "living composers" as individuals alive as of January 1, 2014.) All students are required to participate in this eveningŐs performance. If you have any questions about repertoire see Mr. Cosand promptly.

 

Attendance

 

I try to give each student an individual grade each week, as well as a grade for any recital or for each other performance. If you are absent without a good reason you are not given a good grade.

 

Problems?

 

See me about problems with this course. My office hours are posted at http://www.waltercosand.com/office-hours.html

I can be reached by phone or by e-mail.